Sunday, July 15, 2012

Much needed

We started Saturday with a Zero wind forecast. Sailflow had us down to 4 knots or less for the day. Time to wash the boat I guess, as there is not enough of a breeze to move this Lady. So I hit topsides with the hose and brush, while Deb took to the task below. I must have washed hundreds of spiders into the bay on that hot and steamy day. The Sun was brutal, and I was  happy to be playing in water. I didn't jam any toes or pinky fingers, but I did split one finger open on the toe rail. Damn that hurts, and the blood spatters were all over the deck. After a bandage and some extra scrubbing for the dried blood, I was feeling a bit wiped out. The Sun and the humidity just took the wind out of my sails, and I was ready to call it quits, but like a switch being thrown on a wind machine, the breeze picked up, and we said, "What the hail, let's sail!"

We got a late start, but managed to cruise out about 12 miles NW into Ontario. We turned back and were close hauled in a dying breeze and had to motor in the last mile or so. We pulled up to Thornton Point for an anchor drop. First time my new chain hit mud. Deb did an awesome job of maneuvering, and getting my hand signals. I think this was the first time I never touched the wheel for a drop. Sweet. Deb is quite the helms person. Hell, I can't even steer a straight line anymore.

We had a beautiful night, but unfortunately I couldn't sleep at all. I am known for being a prairie dog at anchor. I pop up at the slightest change in breeze or sound, but this night it wasn't that at all.  Earlier I think I got a little De-hydrated, and while trimming the sails I felt a bit weird. I had a headache, and kind of queasy.  I took some Excedrin for migraines, because that's what it felt like, and that's the last thing I need out on the water. Well, these pills have caffeine in them, and it kept me awake most of the night. I think I actually fell asleep around 3 am. Being awake I noticed all kinds of stupid activity in the anchorage. We had a powerboat pass by at 2:30 am close enough to hand me a sandwich. I would have said beer, but I think they drank it all. There was a powerboat with no lights doing about 40-50 across the Bay, with other boats out there. Yikes! This was not going to help me sleep. I finally passed out to the water lapping on the hull, and all was well.

The morning tea in the cockpit made it all worth while.
 

We so needed to get out and feel like cruisers, and this did the trick. A deep breath of cool evening air, with the stars and moon shining, and waking to the smell of coffee from the boats at anchor, with just the birds in the trees making any noise, is pure therapy.
 

Cheers to mother nature!

8 comments:

  1. Helped your funk some? A night at anchor and a cruise always seem to do the trick for me.

    Deb
    S/V Kintala
    www.theretirementproject.blogspot.com

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    1. Yes, the funkiness has receded somewhat :)

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  2. Paul, as I mentioned on FB, so jealous! We are not cooling off at night enough to make it the least bit comfortable. I guess we will make up for our time in fall!

    On the upside we did get the Autopilot install finihsed up and dock checks completed. I was very excited it #1 did not go up in smoke when we put the juice to it #2 it actully worked out of the box!! Top the weekend off with cockpit speaker install things are not so bad. Next week we start on pulling that fuel tank under the setee, yours might be called tank!

    Anthony
    S/V Magnolia
    http://a2baker.wordpress.com/

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    1. I have to know what autopilot you guys chose, as we are in the market also. Nothing like passing the smoke test :)

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    2. Paul, it is a Raymarine X-10, Type I Linear Drive and p70 control head. We accomplished the inport commisioning last week and plan to get underway tommorow for the underway commisioning. I will put together a blog post with pictures and wire run descriptions soon.

      Anthony
      S/V Magnolia
      http://a2baker.wordpress.com/

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  3. Sounds like a great time .. and well-deserved! I wouldn't get much sleep either with those boats passing by like that. I think that's what I will fear the most (when weather is good) when anchoring out ... the idiots! =)

    This post makes us anxious to get out there and do the same .. it's been too long!

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    1. Nothing like a good sail and some solitary time at anchor (except for the night stalkers) to get you back in the game. Don't fret the anchoring too much. I just worry too much and jump up at every sound. Deb sleeps like a rock at anchor. As long as Ken does the "ground hog", reacting to every movement or noise, you should sleep just fine :)

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  4. I'm glad to have found your blog (through The Retirement Project). You guys are a bit ahead of us in the planning stage since you are living on your boat and have sold your home. We still have a son in college, so aren't ready to leap off the dock yet. But we try to get out and cruise as often as possible in the good weather. Our current boat, a Cal 34, is for sale. When we sell her, we'll really be able to move forward with this whole plan.
    Morning tea in the cockpit? Absolutely!

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